Published February 2, 2021

Ep 085: Generational Differences: Bridging the Divide, Nona Jones and Jason Dorsey

TOPICS IN THIS PODCAST

Leading Organizations

Are there valid generational differences between older and younger workers? Do Millenials and Gen Z lack a “work ethic”? Join Nona Jones and Jason Dorsey as they have a fascinating conversation about the intersection of generational demographics, technology, and the culture of work, and offer practical tips on how to build stronger generational bridges in the workplace.

Show Notes

SUMMARY:

Are there valid generational differences between older and younger workers? Do Millenials and Gen Z lack a “work ethic”? Join Nona Jones and Jason Dorsey as they have a fascinating conversation about the intersection of generational demographics, technology, and the culture of work, and offer practical tips on how to build stronger generational bridges in the workplace.

 

KEY TAKEAWAYS:

  • Through the lens of age, or demographics, an “emerging leader” is a leader who is 30 years old or under.
  • Because of their relationship to technology, younger (“emerging”) leaders may have a different work ethic—work “style”—as compared to older leaders.
    • Younger leaders expect to use their mobile device during work.
    • Younger leaders desire more frequent feedback.
    • Younger leaders expect to make a difference from their first day of employment.
  • Generational differences can be positive or negative, depending on how companies choose to approach them.
  • People under 30 are also often interested in efficiency, particularly in regards to relationships and communication. “A text can be more efficient than a phone conversation.”
  • Older generations often have a misperception that younger generations are “all about me.” However, younger generations also often have a greater degree of optimism and also a mentality that is globally-oriented.
  • Compared to older leaders, many emerging leaders think much bigger and broader. They live in a world where they can have a conversation with anyone on the globe.
  • At the same time, we should be careful to use technology to enable relationships, not replace relationships.
  • Younger generations use online spaces to connect with people who are like-minded. Older generations often use social media to stay connected with people (family and friends)
  • Every generation has a different generation of “normal.” Everyone brings a natural view of what technology and work can look like.
  • Because we all tend to create or curate an online image, social media can create insecurity and anxiety. There’s constant pressure to “keep up” with others. This can be a challenge for younger generations because they don’t yet know how to deal with the pressure and anxiety.
  • In regards to recruiting, retention, and engagement, the north star is, “How do we get people of all generations excited to show up to work, and to see this, NOT as a job, but as a career.”
  • People are craving purpose and mission. Make sure your mission and vision is larger than just making money. People want to make a difference in the world, they want to know that they matter.
  • To attract younger job applicants:
    • The first two sentences of a job description matter.
    • The application should be able to be completed online through a mobile device.
    • As they come on-board, help them to feel that they are making progress even if they are not being promoted.
  • Video is the language of younger generations. Use video to attract potential employers, to tell them about your organization.
  • To build stronger generational bridges:
    • Have candid conversations about generations, not just “Gen Z” or “Millenials”. It’s not a “generations” conversation; it’s a generational conversation.
    • Be open to different views and different perspectives (especially on technology).

 

 

 

REFLECTION QUESTIONS:

  1. As leaders, you are constantly working to manage change. In what area of your life or leadership are you sensing it might be time for reinvention?

 

  1. In this podcast, Paula outlined three questions to understand why you are good at what you do. These things will never change, even if you are going through a major change. How would you answer these questions?
    • What are you good at? 
    • What do you love? 
    • What do trusted people around you notice that you’re good at and love? 

 

  1. What are the implications of your answers when you think about the area of your life or leadership that is ripe for reinvention?  

 

  1. Sadie said, “It’s not wrong to be afraid but It’s wrong to sit in it.” What is your plan to combat fear as you go through your season of reinvention?

 

RELATED LINKS:

Nona Jones 

Jason Dorsey 

Jason at the 2019 GLS: Generational Clues Uncovered 

Nona at the 2020 GLS: Safe is Insufficient 

The Global Leadership Summit

 

 

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